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Ernest Miller Ernest Miller pursues research and writing on cyberlaw, intellectual property, and First Amendment issues. Mr. Miller attended the U.S. Naval Academy before attending Yale Law School, where he was president and co-founder of the Law and Technology Society, and founded the technology law and policy news site LawMeme. He is a fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. Ernest Miller's blog postings can also be found @
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June 21, 2005

Journalists Use Blogs, Don't Trust Them

Posted by Ernest Miller

Wow, what a paragraph in this report on a study on how journalists use blogs (ClickZ | Study Bolsters Blog-Related PR Practices).

Journalists mostly used blogs for finding story ideas (53 percent), researching and referencing facts (43 percent) and finding sources (36 percent). And 33 percent said they used blogs to uncover breaking news or scandals. Still, despite their reliance on blogs for reporting, only 1 percent of journalists found blogs credible, the study found.
Now the poll was probably worded oddly; I don't trust all blogs either. Still, I would definitely like to know more about this study.

The study itself does not appear to be online, but read the press release here: Eleventh Annual Euro RSCG Magnet and Columbia University Survey of Media Finds More than Half of Journalists Use Blogs Despite Being Unconvinced of their Credibility.

Few blog-using journalists are engaging with this new medium by posting to blogs or publishing their own; such activities might be seen as compromising objectivity and thus credibility.
Geez.

Must read. Hope the study is put on the web soon.

via Blogvangelism

Comments (1) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Blogging and Journalism


COMMENTS

1. the english guy on June 22, 2005 05:09 AM writes...

Thanks for that information, most useful! It serves to highlight the fact that "journalists" only use blogs as a mechanism for their media, rather than as a media in it's own right.

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